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Dec 16 2009

Osso Buco means “Hole of Bone” in Italian

Published by at 10:09 pm under Cooking at Home

Tonight for dinner, we whipped up a classic Italian meal of osso buco using beef shanks, but it’s traditionally done with veal shanks (baby cow). The very first time I had osso buco was in Rome, and I realized how much I’ve missed out for not trying it earlier! Osso buco is slow braised with a combination of vegetables, stock, herbs, and wine. All of the flavors get incorporated while the meat becomes so tender it literally can fall off the bone. I love the different textures and flavors of the juicy meat, smooth gelatin, and savory marrow. It’s a unique dish that you can’t find at any restaurant, so we were fortunate enough to prepare this in the comfort of our kitchen – thanks to Giada De Laurentiis’ recipe from The Food Network. It just takes a little bit of time and effort to achieve a satisfying meal.

First, chop up 1 small onion, 1 carrot, and 1 celery stalk. Next, place a sprig of rosemary, thyme, 1 bay leaf, and a couple cloves of garlic into cheesecloth and tie it up - this is the herb bouquet that will go into the pot for braising.

First, chop up 1 small onion, 1 carrot, and 1 celery stalk. Next, place a sprig of rosemary, thyme, 1 bay leaf, and a couple cloves of garlic into cheesecloth and tie it up - this is the herb bouquet that will go into the pot for braising.

Pat the beef (or veal) shanks dry to remove excess moisture. Secure the meat to the bone with kitchen twine - the reason for this is because you don't want the meat to fall apart once it becomes extremely tender! Next, season with salt and pepper, then dredge the shanks in flour and place into a hot Dutch oven pot and brown all sides. Remove shanks and set aside.

Pat the beef (or veal) shanks dry to remove excess moisture. Secure the meat to the bone with kitchen twine - the reason for this is because you don't want the meat to fall apart once it becomes extremely tender! Next, season with salt and pepper, then dredge the shanks in flour and place into a hot pot and brown all sides. Remove shanks and set aside.

In the same pot, saute the onion, carrots and celery. Season with salt and cook until soft, about 8 minutes. Then add 1 tbsp of tomato paste and mix well.

In the same pot, saute the onion, carrots and celery. Season with salt and cook until soft, about 8 minutes. Then add 1 tbsp of tomato paste and mix well.

Return the browned shanks to the pot and add 1 cup of red wine (Giada used white wine, but we changed it up). Once the liquid reduces by half, add the herb bouquet and 2 cups of veal demi glace (use chicken stock if you don't have it) and bring to a boil. Reduce to low heat, cover, and simmer for about 2 hours or until the meat is tender.

Return the browned shanks to the pot and add 1 cup of red wine (Giada used white wine, but we changed it up). Once the liquid reduces by half, add the herb bouquet and 2 cups of veal demi glace (use chicken stock if you don't have it) and bring to a boil. Reduce to low heat, cover, and simmer for about 2 hours or until the meat is tender.

Once the shanks are done, remove the twine and sprinkle with parsley and lemon zest. Since we recently had risotto, we decided not to make it for this dish, but risotto is commonly served with osso buco. We completed the meal with a nice glass of red wine and pretty poinsettias to get in the holiday spirit.

Once the shanks are done, remove the twine and sprinkle with parsley and lemon zest. Since we recently had risotto, we decided not to make it for this dish, but risotto is commonly served with osso buco. We completed the meal with a nice glass of red wine and pretty poinsettias to get in the holiday spirit.

To view or print-out this recipe, click here: Osso Buco

13 responses so far

13 Responses to “Osso Buco means “Hole of Bone” in Italian”

  1. richon 16 Dec 2009 at 10:20 pm

    Wow!! My favorite. That looks delicious.

  2. Chef Eon 17 Dec 2009 at 1:40 am

    Beautiful girl! You have captured the poetic essence of this dish!

  3. Alta (Tasty Eats At Home)on 17 Dec 2009 at 5:36 am

    Oh my, this sounds amazing. I love beef/veal shanks – they have so much flavor.

  4. Natasha - 5 Star Foodieon 17 Dec 2009 at 7:38 am

    Looks awesome! I haven’t had Osso bucco in ages, must make one over the holidays!

  5. Favyon 17 Dec 2009 at 7:41 am

    Wow! I need to try this… It looks tasty

  6. Conor @ HoldtheBeefon 17 Dec 2009 at 9:32 pm

    Great bone holes! :D

  7. stephchowson 18 Dec 2009 at 5:49 am

    Not only does this sound amazing, it looks beautiful!!! Tender meat is the only way to have it :)

  8. Dhaleon 18 Dec 2009 at 9:30 am

    Your osso buco looks delicious! We still have two more veal shanks in the freezer (we got greedy and bought too many) from when we made osso buco a few weeks ago. The bones in your shanks look like they’re full of marrow. Lucky!!!!

  9. Christine @ Fresh Local and Beston 18 Dec 2009 at 9:40 am

    This is a stunning fall off the bone experiences. Even though I spent two years learning Italian in college, I did not know that osso buco meant hole of the bone, that marrow is like icing on top of a cake. Spectacular!

  10. Bizon 18 Dec 2009 at 11:33 am

    I never thought of wrapping the shanks before – brilliant! I’ve recently come across silicon bands that I LOVE! Great for the barbecue too!

  11. Carissa @ Fit To Indulgeon 28 Dec 2009 at 9:49 am

    Osso bucco looks amazing! That’s going in the recipe box. :)

  12. Ed C.on 12 May 2010 at 1:34 pm

    woo hoo i’ve found it!

    sincerely,
    foodaddict’s biggest fan ;)

  13. Deborah St.Hilaireon 26 Jan 2013 at 12:07 pm

    I make this and add a few more veggies: turnip, parsnip and kale. Just a bit of each but it adds so many nutrients and tastes yummy! My husband likes it with chicken broth and white wine. I am partial to bed wine and beef broth. Try both…you won’t be sorry.

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